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There are a number of reasons that Ohio residents might want to appoint a professional trustee. They might not have any immediate family, or there could be more conflict between immediate family members than anyone is willing to deal with while trying to administer the trust.

The trust might be too complex for a family member to administer. If a business is included in the trust, it might be necessary to hire people to run the business until it can be sold, or there might be a complicated succession plan in place. Real estate owned by the trust could require management, or there could be an active lawsuit against the trust. Overall, the trust might simply require a full-time trustee.

People can appoint a trustee to handle financial matters and still put friends and family in charge of health care decisions in case they become incapacitated. They can also appoint a loved one as a co-trustee alongside the professional trustee. It is important to discuss the appointment with the professional trustee beforehand to make sure the trustee is willing to take on the tasks and is familiar with the estate plan. An attorney may also be helpful if family members try to create problems by insisting that distributions to beneficiaries or other aspects of administration should happen more quickly.

People who have not yet created an estate plan might also want to speak with an attorney. A trust may be useful in a number of different circumstances that do not just involve a large or complex estate. For example, a person might want to specify how family members receive distributions and tie those distributions to age, educational attainment or other milestones.